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VOLUME 3 , ISSUE 1 ( February, 2011 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Anxiety Measurements among Dental Students undergoing Third Molar Removal

Channaveer Pattanshetti, Rajendra Desai

Citation Information : Pattanshetti C, Desai R. Anxiety Measurements among Dental Students undergoing Third Molar Removal. CODS J Dent 2011; 3 (1):21-27.

DOI: 10.5005/cods-3-1-21

License: CC BY-NC-ND 3.0

Published Online: 01-02-2011

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2011; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Background and objective

This study was conducted to quantify the anxiety associated with third molar extraction in dental students. And to compare the anxiety levels between males and females, among impacted and non-impacted groups.

Methods

The study included 100 dental students who reported to Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dental Sciences, requiring mandibular third molar removal. Only those patients who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected. The anxiety levels were evaluated based on the scores of the Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale.

Results

Results showed scores among female patients was higher than males; however the difference between male and female patients was statistically not significant. Among impacted and non-impacted groups score was higher among the impacted group, but the difference between impacted and non-impacted groups was statistically not significant too.

Conclusion

To conclude, maxillofacial surgeons should consider patients who visit dental offices for third molar impaction surgery as most prone to anxiety which could either result from conditioning or learned responses from their peers. Noteworthy, prior awareness of the patient's psychologic makeup and susceptibility to anxiety may be of value, thus enabling appropriate therapy and improved recovery postoperatively.


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